Inquiry-Based Genomics Lab Module Collection

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Title of Abstract: Inquiry-Based Genomics Lab Module Collection

Name of Author: Lois Banta
Author Company or Institution: Williams College
Author Title: Associate Professor
PULSE Fellow: No
Applicable Courses: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bioinformatics, Cell Biology, Ecology and Environmental Biology, Evolutionary Biology, General Biology, Genetics, Integrative Biology, Microbiology, Neuroscience, Organismal Biology, Physiology & Anatomy, Plant Biology & Botany, Virology
Course Levels: Across the Curriculum, Faculty Development, Introductory Course(s), Upper Division Course(s)
Approaches: Material Development
Keywords: inquiry-based integrative genomics bioinformatics faculty-development

Name, Title, and Institution of Author(s): Erica J. Crespi, Vassar College Ross H. Nehm, Ohio State University Jodi A. Schwarz, Vassar College Susan Singer, Carleton College Cathryn A. Manduca, Carleton College Eliot C. Bush, Harvey Mudd College Elizabeth Collins, Vassar College Cara M. Constance, Hiram College Derek Dean, Williams College David Esteban, Vassar College Sean Fox, Carleton College John McDaris, Carleton College Carol Ann Paul, Wellesley College Ginny Quinan, Wellesley College Kathleen M. Raley-Susman, Vassar College Marc L. Smith, Vassar College Christopher S. Wallace, Whitman College Ginger S. Withers, Whitman College Lynn Caporale, Consultant

Goals and intended outcomes of the project or effort, in the context of the Vision and Change report and recommendations: The integration of genomic and bioinformatic approaches into undergraduate curricula represents one response to the national calls for biology teaching that is more quantitative and that promotes deeper understanding of biological systems through interdisciplinary analyses. Yet relatively few of the faculty members who teach undergraduate biology have expertise in the fields of genomics or bioinformatics. For these instructors, designing new teaching labs in a field that is developing so rapidly can feel particularly daunting. Our genomics education initiative was designed to address the challenges of helping faculty members integrate genome-scale science into the undergraduate classroom.

Describe the methods and strategies that you are using: The project utilized a grassroots model for faculty development, by supporting a national consortium of faculty members from eight liberal arts colleges in 1) learning about genomics and bioinformatics; 2) developing curriculum and laboratory teaching materials that stem from their own research and/or teaching interests, and that are informed by research in the learning sciences; and 3) devising tools to evaluate the efficacy of their genomics curricular innovations. Three workshops over three years supported these goals through a combination of learning from expertise within the participating group and from outside expertise on specific topics. The workshops brought together a total of 34 faculty participants from 19 institutions to develop a set of lab modules containing a substantial genomics component. Building on a proven faculty development model formulated by the geoscience education community, we complemented the multi-workshop program with a web-based interactive information portal. The initiative was structured such that the iterative interactions resulting from our three-workshop series would allow participants to share the experience of curriculum development, from the inception of an idea for a curricular module to the assessment of the implementation of that module, thereby generating a community of genomics educators among undergraduate institutions in the process. In addition, by bringing together educators from different institutions and scientific backgrounds, we aimed to stimulate discussion of interdisciplinary approaches to teaching genomics and facilitate the establishment of collaborations with other colleges and universities.

Describe the evaluation methods that you used (or intended to use) to determine whether the project or effort achieved the desired goals and outcomes: Products include peer-reviewed, guided inquiry-based, integrated instructional units (I3Us) adaptable to a range of teaching settings, with a focus on both model and non-model systems. Each curricular module is built on vetted design principles: (1) they have clear pedagogical objectives; (2) they are integrated with lessons taught in the lecture; (3) they are designed to integrate the learning of science content with learning about the process of science; and (4) they require student reflection and discussion (National Research Council, America’s Lab Report, Committee on High School Science Laboratories: Role and Vision; 2005). Each I3U was peer reviewed by fellow participants, as well as by a professional project consultant who has extensive experience with web-based description of teaching materials using this format to ensure that the I3U met the design criteria articulated above, and to evaluate whether the Activity Sheet provided both an easily accessible overview of the content and enough detailed information for other instructors to adapt and implement the material and its associated assessment strategies.

Impacts of project or effort on students, fellow faculty, department or institution. If no time to have an impact, anticipated impacts: Eleven I3Us were designed and implemented as multi-week modules within the context of an existing biology course (e.g., Microbiology, Comparative Anatomy, Introduction to Neurobiology); an additional three I3Us were incorporated into interdisciplinary Biology/Computer Science classes. Although these I3Us were designed for courses currently taught by the project participant within the specific institution’s curriculum, we propose that they can be inserted into other courses that encompass similar content and/or learning goals. We have received numerous communications from colleagues at other institutions who have adapted our I3Us for their courses.

Describe any unexpected challenges you encountered and your methods for dealing with them: Many participants lacked expertise needed to analyze sequence data or design wet labs and were overwhelmed by the array of possible tools, deciding which tools were useful in which scientific contexts, and the challenges of mastering their user interfaces. Some were concerned about teaching material with which they had little previous scientific experience. Most were isolated from colleagues who shared their interest or had the needed expertise to support their initial learning in this area. We provided hands-on training in three intensive days of short workshops, enabling participants to become familiar with bioinformatic tools for finding sequences, predicting the structure of proteins, visualizing and comparing genomes, and constructing phylogenetic trees. Participants who needed significantly more time to explore the tools and develop self-sufficiency maintained communication with at least one of the presenters over the course of the year, to obtain more training and to get ideas. For many, adapting bioinformatics tools into their modules was more easily accomplished by asking phylogenetic questions rather than adapting tools that could be used to explore genome-level questions of gene function or structure. The greatest challenge was that no robust assessment system, characterized by valid and reliable instruments evaluated by experts in education and psychometrics, existed to assess the efficacy of newly developed genomics and bioinformatics curricula. To help faculty build assessment tools, we provided: (1) A professional development session for faculty participants that reviewed the basics of educational assessment and the types of tools that could be employed in assessment efforts; (2) Individualized consultations to help participants build their assessments; and (3) Individualized consultations with faculty to assist in the interpretation of assessment data derived from point (2) above.

Describe your completed dissemination activities and your plans for continuing dissemination: All modules, together with extensive supporting material, are accessible on a dedicated website (https://serc.carleton.edu/genomics/activities.html) that also provides links to bioinformatics tools and on-line assessment and pedagogical resources, as well as all presentations from all three workshops, pre- and post-workshop content, and suggested readings provided by workshop leaders. The project website serves as a portal to Activity Sheets describing each I3U; these Activity Sheets include learning goals, teaching tips, and links to teaching materials, as well as downloadable assessment tools, that can be customized by any interested educator. Information about the collection of I3Us has been disseminated via publication.

Acknowledgements: This information has been published previously (Cell Biology Education-Life Science Education 11:203-208; 2012). The project was funded by the Teagle Foundation, with supplemental support from Williams College, Vassar College, and Schering-Plough.

Internships for Undergraduate Students with Disabilities

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Title of Abstract: Internships for Undergraduate Students with Disabilities

Name of Author: Richard Mankin
Author Company or Institution: USDA-ARS-Center for Med., Agric., Vet. Entomology
PULSE Fellow: No
Applicable Courses: Agricultural Sciences, Biophysics, Ecology and Environmental Biology, Organismal Biology
Course Levels: Upper Division Course(s)
Approaches: Assessment, Research
Keywords: interdisciplinarity assessment research agriculture mentorship

Goals and intended outcomes of the project or effort, in the context of the Vision and Change report and recommendations: Enhance research experiences of undergraduate biology students with disabilities by providing internships at an agricultural research laboratory. In the last three years, we have focused more on internships in the broader context of the students' educational institutions and our local resources. In interactions with the interns’ educational institutions, we have coordinated research projects of interns with their instructors and facilitated incorporation of the research into their coursework. Subsequent presentations by the interns to classmates were expected to be of benefit to the class and to the instructors. Also, we have encouraged interns to interact with other researchers and technical staff at the Center and nearby institutions, including the University of Florida and the Florida Division of Plant Industry.

Describe the methods and strategies that you are using: Design multidisciplinary research projects that can be completed during a summer. The projects include components of pest management, biology, electronic and acoustic technology, and computer programming. Coordinate efforts with instructors and advisors at the students' educational institutions. Provide opportunities for additional interaction of students with other researchers in multiple institutions in the local area (University of Florida, Florida Division of Plant Industry). Wherever possible, make opportunities for the students to explore areas of interest where they have particular skills or strengths. Include field trips to nearby farms and agribusinesses. Assess results.

Describe the evaluation methods that you used (or intended to use) to determine whether the project or effort achieved the desired goals and outcomes: Discussions with interns, staff, and researchers. Adaptations of survey tools discussed in Vision and Change Final Report

Impacts of project or effort on students, fellow faculty, department or institution. If no time to have an impact, anticipated impacts: Students were enthusiastic at the enhanced opportunities to interact with peers and other researchers in carrying out their projects, as well as to obtain feedback from farmers. Many of the technical and scientific staff responded with helpful suggestions and opened their labs to further interactions and learning experiences for the interns. Feedback was provided in seminars where the interns presented their work. Assessments enabled identification of problem areas.

Describe any unexpected challenges you encountered and your methods for dealing with them: The intense level of activity caused additional stress for some of the staff not used to working with young persons. Contact with these staff was reduced whenever possible, and the impact was lessened by the short, 8-week duration of the internships. In addition, each student has different interests and needs, and each research project has different dead-ends and barriers to overcome. Aspects of several projects failed. Fear, caution, or unfamiliarity often presents high barriers to interactions with persons who have apparent disabilities. Seminars where students presented information and brainstorming sessions helped overcome some of these challenges.

Describe your completed dissemination activities and your plans for continuing dissemination: Journal articles by the interns have been published, seminars have been presented, and researchers have been recruited as mentors for next year.

Acknowledgements: Funding from the Citrus Research and Development Foundation, and support and helpful comments from many local staff and researchers.

Piloting an Undergraduate Research Biomathematics Program

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Title of Abstract: Piloting an Undergraduate Research Biomathematics Program

Name of Author: John Berges
Author Company or Institution: University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Author Title: Associate professor
PULSE Fellow: No
Applicable Courses: Bioinformatics, Ecology and Environmental Biology
Course Levels: Sophmore/Junior
Approaches: Interdisciplinary Research Experiences
Keywords: biomathematics undergraduate research experiences mathematical modeling bioinformatics curricular integration

Name, Title, and Institution of Author(s): Erica Young, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee Istvan Lauko, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee Nigel Rothfels, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee Gabriella Pinter, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Goals and intended outcomes of the project or effort, in the context of the Vision and Change report and recommendations: Recognizing that the 2011 Vision and Change Report gave mathematics requirements special attention in the “New Biology” (including systems biology and modeling), and that “interdisciplinarity” was identified as a key goal, faculty in Biological Sciences, Mathematical Sciences and Freshwater Sciences have collaborated to develop an NSF-supported research program at the interface of Undergraduate Biology and Mathematics (UBM). The program promotes cross-disciplinary education in biology and mathematics with a focus on undergraduate research, and strengthens the culture and academic foundation of interdisciplinary biology-mathematics education.

Describe the methods and strategies that you are using: 1. Supporting cohorts of undergraduate students with active mentoring and collaborative learning through authentic research projects as part of a two-year research immersion in key biology-mathematics research areas. 2. Developing new curricular components to encourage interdisciplinary training through both a certificate program in Quantitative Biology, and a research-oriented Biomathematics specialization within the mathematics major.

Describe the evaluation methods that you used (or intended to use) to determine whether the project or effort achieved the desired goals and outcomes: UBM students and mentors are participating in the CURE survey, administered online and processed by Prof. Lopatto (Grinnell College).

Impacts of project or effort on students, fellow faculty, department or institution. If no time to have an impact, anticipated impacts: The program has exceeded expectations. At the undergraduate level more students recognize the need for sophisticated quantitative preparation for applied sciences careers, and more students get involved in undergraduate research. At this point our program has come to include a much broader group of “affiliated” students (some partially supported and some who receive no financial support), and contributes to larger campus initiatives to expand undergraduate research opportunities. Motivated and supported by their experience in the UBM program, more than 90% of the participating students have continued or plan to continue their studies in professional (medical and veterinary) or graduate schools. At the graduate level, Biology students have benefited from having mathematics faculty involved in their research and dissertation/thesis work. There has also been an increase in Mathematics graduate students working on interdisciplinary projects arising from increased interactions between Biology, Public Health, Freshwater Sciences and Mathematics faculty. At the faculty research level, the program interactions have fostered collaborative research proposals submitted internally and to external agencies, and several of the proposals have attracted new interdisciplinary research funding.

Describe any unexpected challenges you encountered and your methods for dealing with them: While our program is succeeding at many levels, we face persistent challenges, including: bridging different teaching expectations (e.g. course loads) for faculty in different units that participate in the program; providing appropriate teaching credit and release time for program development; finding ways to compensate mentors for additional research costs involved in offering projects; and finding appropriate ways to pay student stipends. The Vison and Change 2011 report recommended advocating for increased status, recognition and reward for innovation in teaching, but so far there is little evidence of progress in this area. We have started implementation of an interdisciplinary certificate program in Quantitative Biology, and a research-oriented biomathematics specialization within the Mathematics major. There are, of course, considerable administrative barriers to new courses, and to have a new specialization approved in a timely fashion. The paperwork necessary and the lack of clerical support make these efforts difficult and time consuming. Negotiating early in the development of the program with senior administrators (e.g. the Provost) has proven to be a key element in success. Beyond this, the program would be difficult to scale up in its current configuration. The results have been very encouraging, but the resource requirements per student are very high. As a program built on faculty being willing to take on substantial additional responsibilities (including advising, travel with students, new course development, administration of stipends, etc.) with little or no compensation, the program succeeds because of the individual commitments of faculty whose personal and professional circumstances can and will change over time. Like other highly successful “boutique” programs, the UBM is vulnerable to personnel changes and administrative neglect, and we need to work out what sorts of changes and administrative support will be necessary to move the program

Describe your completed dissemination activities and your plans for continuing dissemination: Project results have been presented at several national Undergraduate Research conferences. In is intended that all undergraduate research projects will result in publications in the primary scientific literature.

Acknowledgements: Support from UWM in the form of a UROP-DIN award funding two new faculty positions in Biomathematics. National Science Foundation Award 1129056.

Collaboration and Reform at the University of Tennessee

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Title of Abstract: Collaboration and Reform at the University of Tennessee

Name of Author: Elisabeth Schussler
Author Company or Institution: University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Author Title: Assistant Professor
PULSE Fellow: No
Applicable Courses: Cell Biology, Ecology and Environmental Biology, Evolutionary Biology
Course Levels: Introductory Course(s)
Approaches: GTA professional development, Mixed Approach
Keywords: process of science, discussion sections, conceptual assessments, class observations, GTA professional development

Name, Title, and Institution of Author(s): Anna Jo Auerbach, University of Tennessee

Goals and intended outcomes of the project or effort, in the context of the Vision and Change report and recommendations: In spring 2010, the University of Tennessee – Knoxville’s Division of Biology embarked on a process to transform their core curriculum for biology majors to focus more explicitly on the process of science. A Task Force of faculty from three Biology Departments, led by the first author of this abstract and with the support of the three Department Heads, convened to consider how to integrate the principles set forth in Vision and Change into the curriculum. That process resulted in a plan to re-structure the first year biology majors’ sequence at UT, which was almost unanimously approved by the faculty of all three departments after a careful process of vetting ideas, gathering feedback, and modifying the plan over a period of two years. For UT, collaboration and compromise ultimately led to a consensus, but we relied heavily on Vision and Change to justify and direct our efforts.

Describe the methods and strategies that you are using: The Division is now moving forward with a plan to integrate the Vision and Change concepts and competencies and active learning into a revised two semester cellular-organismal sequence, to integrate small group discussion sections into the courses, and re-focus the labs on the process of science. These changes are being monitored by the instructors of the courses, who are meeting regularly this year and next to create implementation strategies. Several instructors are piloting the changes this academic year, a process leading to the refinement of the learning outcomes and design of class assignments and activities that help students reach those outcomes. All classes will use these concepts, competencies, and associated activities in the 2013-2014 academic year. Planning will soon begin for the larger change in course structure: adding the discussion sections and creating the independent lab (lab activities were transformed from cookbook to inquiry-based experiences based on research being done at UT in 2011-2012). These changes will occur in the 2014-2015 school year; we will soon incorporate graduate students into the planning meetings to foster ideas that align with their perspectives as teachers of those sections.

Describe the evaluation methods that you used (or intended to use) to determine whether the project or effort achieved the desired goals and outcomes: Student understanding of the five conceptual learning outcomes are being monitored by the creation and implementation of on-line short answer questions that ask students to explain a cellular / molecular aspect of each of the five concepts, and an organismal / ecological aspect of each of the five concepts. These questions have been tested over the last year and appear to be reliably assessed via a 3 point scoring rubric. Competency outcomes are currently being assessed in the laboratory by student self-reports, but will soon be joined by common questions on the laboratory final exam. We are also monitoring student responses of the ‘most important thing’ they learned in the courses to see whether piloting sections differ from non-piloting sections in documentable ways. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, we have begun to document the process of change at the level of the faculty and course. We started class observations last fall and plan to monitor changes in individual faculty members’ courses over the transition from the old to the new curriculum. Observations are recording measures such as the number of questions asked by faculty and students, number of clicker questions, student discussion, and time spent on lecture. Faculty are also volunteering to be interviewed each semester, and are providing course materials for analysis. We are encouraging open discussion of the findings of these observations among the faculty as a mechanism for reform.

Impacts of project or effort on students, fellow faculty, department or institution. If no time to have an impact, anticipated impacts: The changes to the curriculum in the Division have been used at the institutional level as an exemplar of curricular transformation, and the first author of this abstract won a college-wide teaching award for these efforts. The Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences seems particularly interested in these changes, and asked the first author to participate in an active learning training session presented at the Department Head’s retreat in August. A recent meeting among the faculty who teach the non-biology majors’ courses resulted in them adopting the majors’ courses conceptual outcomes as their overall course themes as well, and the Vision and Change concepts and competencies have also been adopted as the learning outcomes for the entire Division for the purposes of SACS assessment. The changes to courses taught primarily by graduate students also inspired the submission of an NSF research coordination network incubator to focus on developing instructional skills for GTAs teaching reformed courses. This proposal (BioTAP) was funded and will inspire UT - and we hope other institutions - to consider how professional development can be provided to both faculty and GTAs to best foster introductory curriculum reform efforts.

Describe any unexpected challenges you encountered and your methods for dealing with them: Sharing of course materials has been an unexpected challenge. Everyone who teaches the introductory courses expressed a desire to share materials such as powerpoints and assignments and clicker questions, but finding a virtual location to gather those materials and then actually getting the materials placed into that location has been difficult. We have now assigned one person to be the point person to collect the materials, and will be sending them to physically meet with faculty in their offices with a memory stick to transfer materials. Another challenge has been fear of trying new things in the classroom. As we seek to integrate active learning into classrooms, we are finding that faculty need very specific models of strategies they can use. We think this is because many faculty who have not tried active learning have a fear of trying something and 'failing', so they are reluctant to create their own materials. We have been sharing existing assignments and active learning activities with each other and encouraging faculty to use them or modify them for their own classes. We are also encouraging more cross-visitation of classrooms to see the materials in action. Finally, we are also meeting some resistance about reducing course content, but this was not unexpected.

Describe your completed dissemination activities and your plans for continuing dissemination: We have not reached the dissemination phase of our curriculum reform process, but plan to disseminate our evaluation strategies and report on the evolution of the course changes over time, as well as faculty reaction and thoughts about the changes. For the GTA professional development project we have just begun (BioTAP), we have a website (www.bio.utk.edu/BioTAP) which reports on the first meeting of the Steering Committee, and are gathering the names of faculty who want to join the network.

Acknowledgements: The faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates of the Division of Biology at the University of Tennessee. The National Science Foundation for a TUES grant (DUE-1245215) in support of the introductory biology curriculum reform and an RCN-UBE Incubator (DBI-1247938) in support of building a network for GTA professional development.

Enabling Student Success: A Learner-Centered Methodology

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Title of Abstract: Enabling Student Success: A Learner-Centered Methodology

Name of Author: Stephen Aley
Author Company or Institution: University of Texas at El Paso
Author Title: Professor
PULSE Fellow: No
Applicable Courses: and Pre-Calculus, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bioinformatics, Chemistry, Ecology and Environmental Biology, Evolutionary Biology, General Biology, Genetics, Microbiology, Organismal Biology, Physics, Virology
Course Levels: Across the Curriculum
Approaches: Assessment, Changes in Classroom Approach (flipped classroom, clickers, POGIL, etc.), Material Development
Keywords: Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) Curricular Research Interdisciplinary Quantitative Biology Assessment

Name, Title, and Institution of Author(s): James E. Becvar, University of Texas at El Paso Ann H. Darnell, University of Texas at El Paso

Goals and intended outcomes of the project or effort, in the context of the Vision and Change report and recommendations: The Biology undergraduate curriculum at the University of Texas at El Paso is undergoing vast changes that address both the University Mission (a pursuit for excellence in education while providing access to the people of El Paso) and a response to the state of Texas legislature’s call for a larger percentage of students graduating. UTEP Biology undergraduate students are 85% Hispanic, mirroring the population of El Paso and reflecting national trends. The intended outcome is to graduate more students and increase participation of underrepresented students in biomedical research.

Describe the methods and strategies that you are using: The change strategy focuses on a learner-centered methodology. Beginning in 2000, the curriculum format for general chemistry changed by replacing one faculty-delivered lecture (passive learning) per week with a required weekly two-hour workshop (active learning). The workshop includes one hour of problem solving in teams guided by a Peer Leader, followed by one hour of hands-on explorations. The explorations are simple experimental activities which promote student-initiated inquiry, guided by the Peer Leaders. Many activities are based on biology, demonstrating real-world examples of the conceptual material that students encounter in lecture. Building upon this active learning approach, a 2006-awarded HHMI grant implemented undergraduate research for at least one semester, and potentially two, for all biology majors. In 2007, an NSF-funded STEP grant expanded the chemistry peer-led workshop model to mathematics and physics. In 2008, NIH provided funding for a major curricular reform where the Core Competencies (Vision & Change, 2011) of quantitative reasoning, modeling and simulation were implemented, beginning with the first introductory biology course, concluding with new course development that consolidates courses designed to prepare students for various graduate studies including Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering. Eleven additional undergraduate biology courses (three of which were associated laboratory courses) were either revamped or developed (NIH MARC II) with the goal of increasing the emphasis on biological modeling, computational knowledge, statistical analysis, and data analysis. This curricular reformation targeted not only the increased understanding of core concepts including the ability to make connections among interdisciplinary problems, but an increase in perception of relevance of mathematics and computer modeling in the systems approaches required today.

Describe the evaluation methods that you used (or intended to use) to determine whether the project or effort achieved the desired goals and outcomes: 1) Successful course completion 2) Tracking students to graduation 3) Matriculation to graduate and professional school 4) Attitudinal surveys Results of these curricular modifications show that over a six year period between the fall of 2006 and the fall of 2012, the number of biological science students has nearly tripled at UTEP, with the percentage of underrepresented students, primarily Hispanic, rising 10% (to over 85%). Part of this growth is due to less attrition. Assessing degree output six years prior, the graduation rate has risen for those students who declare a major in a biology discipline (from 78% to 85%) over a six year timeframe. If we only maintain an 85% graduation rate, by 2018 we should see more than 1200 students, 85% which are Hispanic, entering the workforce or continuing at the graduate level prepared to critically address not only biology-related problems but complex interdisciplinary issues and challenges of the 21st century.

Impacts of project or effort on students, fellow faculty, department or institution. If no time to have an impact, anticipated impacts: The positive outcomes of the program not only include improved student success in course, but also the enhancement of professional development gained through self-guided and team-guided inquiry, presentation, and leadership opportunities. Leaders gain significant confidence in public speaking and motivational skills. Due to our unique program implementation, undergraduates have a great opportunity to significantly enhance the program. This is because they use their own creativity and are permitted to incorporate their suggestions. The expanded knowledge and experiences gained in peer-led workshops, undergraduate research, and interdisciplinary team-based learning activities are crucial to students planning careers in the research, medical, biotechnology, or academic fields. The modified biology curriculum creates stronger thinkers and self-learners. The institutional structure was impacted with the addition of student-only research laboratories where students learn by doing. *All biology students have an undergraduate research experience built into the courses *Increased statistics knowledge *Increased graduation *Increased matriculation into graduate and professional school *Team building *Leadership skills *Communication skills

Describe any unexpected challenges you encountered and your methods for dealing with them: Maintaining curricular changes

Describe your completed dissemination activities and your plans for continuing dissemination: Presentations at multiple meetings Writing one or more journal articles

Acknowledgements: NIH, NSF, HHMI

Expanding a Research-Infused Botanical Curriculum

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Title of Abstract: Expanding a Research-Infused Botanical Curriculum

Name of Author: Jennifer Ward
Author Company or Institution: University of North Carolina at Asheville
Author Title: Assistant Professor
PULSE Fellow: No
Applicable Courses: Agricultural Sciences, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ecology and Environmental Biology, General Biology, Plant Biology & Botany
Course Levels: Across the Curriculum, Introductory Course(s), Upper Division Course(s)
Approaches: Adding to the literature on how people learn, Assessment, Changes in Classroom Approach (flipped classroom, clickers, POGIL, etc.), Material Development
Keywords: assessment, consortium, inquiry, plant biology, undergraduate research,

Name, Title, and Institution of Author(s): H. David Clarke, University of North Carolina at Asheville Jonathan L. Horton, University of North Carolina at Asheville

Goals and intended outcomes of the project or effort, in the context of the Vision and Change report and recommendations: Our goals were to incorporate inquiry-based research experiences into undergraduate plant biology courses , including lower-division botany (required of all majors), so that all students had an authentic undergraduate research experience. We hoped to improve student learning of course content and familiarize them with the scientific process. Finally, we worked to overcome barriers of faculty time, student time/preparation, and funding.

Describe the methods and strategies that you are using: Undergraduate students developed and tested curricular modules based on their own independent research projects. These modules were tested by other research students before being used in a classroom setting. Then, undergraduate classroom students used modules in their plant biology lab courses, generating hypotheses and data related to the larger research project. In the past three years, we have involved over 300 classroom students and 12 undergraduate research mentors in this project.

Describe the evaluation methods that you used (or intended to use) to determine whether the project or effort achieved the desired goals and outcomes: To determine if exposure to the research-infused botanical curriculum increased students' content knowledge, we administered a quiz in Moodle courseware. To assess the effects of our new curriculum on students' scientific process, we used rubric scores on two journal-style papers; the rubric was tested for intergrader reliability. All data were analyzed with SAS 9.2 with PROC GLM and PROC PAIREDT.

Impacts of project or effort on students, fellow faculty, department or institution. If no time to have an impact, anticipated impacts: Student scores on journal-style papers rose after use of our curricular modules (P = 0.001), and sophomores improved their abilities to state hypotheses (P = 0.001), identify types of variables (P = 0.001), and choose appropriate statistical analyses (P = 0.017). Comparing pre- and post-test results demonstrated that students perceived significant gains in field experience, experimental design and analysis ability, writing experience, comfort with citing primary scientific literature, and recognizing the importance of plant science (P < 0.05 for all). In addition, they gained content knowledge in some botanical subdisciplines (P < 0.05). Research students also showed positive shifts in attitudes towards teaching and their own research. Our approach has now been adopted by other courses, departments, and regional universities.

Describe any unexpected challenges you encountered and your methods for dealing with them: In response to students' ongoing challenges in data interpretation, we have changed the way in which we teach these subjects.

Describe your completed dissemination activities and your plans for continuing dissemination: Results have been presented at 4 disciplinary conferences and 2 education conferences, and we are preparing them for publication. In late 2012, we created a coordinated undergraduate research network to investigate Southern Appalachian ecosystems’ resilience to environmental change. This research focus will serve as a platform for imparting botanical knowledge while advancing quantitative literacy, improving student attitudes towards STEM and NOS (Nature of Science), teaching creative STEM thinking, and encouraging higher-order cognitive processes. The place-based curricular modules that we are creating will be partially developed and administered by undergraduate and graduate research students (3 graduate T.A.s per year) and will have a direct impact on the learning of over 1000 undergraduates per year, including B.S.Ed. students.

Acknowledgements: Undergraduate research students included Scott Arico, Katherine Culatta, Jacob Francis, David Greene, Jennafer Hamlin, Ashley Hanes, Karissa Keen, Aaron Maser, Joseph McKenna, Megan Rayfield, Matt Searels, Katherine Selm, and Emmalie von Kuilenberg. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation (DUE 0942776) and the North Carolina Biotechnology Center.

Problem Spaces: Supporting Student Inquiry Using Online Data

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Title of Abstract: Problem Spaces: Supporting Student Inquiry Using Online Data

Name of Author: Sam Donovan
Author Company or Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Author Title: Research Associate Professor
PULSE Fellow: No
Applicable Courses: Bioinformatics, Ecology and Environmental Biology, Evolutionary Biology, General Biology
Course Levels: Faculty Development, Introductory Course(s)
Approaches: Material Development
Keywords: data, research, bioinformatics, inquiry, analysis

Goals and intended outcomes of the project or effort, in the context of the Vision and Change report and recommendations: Problem Spaces were developed as an alternative to concept-centric instruction. They are designed to provide access to engaging and relevant biological phenomena that can be collaboratively investigated using publicly available research data and analysis tools. Problem Spaces are community driven curricula, that is, faculty can extend and modify the material for use in a wide range of teaching contexts and with diverse audiences. Problem Spaces are also open curricula that change with the science. The use of online links automatically incorporates new data, theory, tool modifications, and techniques. The Problem Space was developed as a model that supports learning science by doing science. In this context, the questions and investigations developed through the exploration of biological phenomena drive the problem solver to learn biological principles and its practice in the context of authentic learning.

Describe the methods and strategies that you are using: In addition to extensive use in classrooms, Problem Spaces have been used effectively in faculty development workshops to engage faculty participants in reconsidering their assumptions about teaching and learning biology. We have found that activities that engage faculty as problem solvers and scientists remind them why they initially got excited about science. We use Problem Spaces to capture faculty attention and model the type of learning environment that could transform their classrooms.

Describe the evaluation methods that you used (or intended to use) to determine whether the project or effort achieved the desired goals and outcomes: We gauge our success based on faculty feedback from workshops and reports of how they have used Problem Space materials and strategies with students.

Impacts of project or effort on students, fellow faculty, department or institution. If no time to have an impact, anticipated impacts: There are over a dozen Problem Spaces available and they have been used by thousands of students and faculty in classroom and professional development settings (https://bioquest.org/bedrock/problem_spaces/). Several papers have been published including one research science project started in a Problem Space and a handful that address educational audiences. One notable impact of the Problem Space model on the undergraduate biology education community lies in promoting the use of data in classrooms. Several recent NSF funded projects (TUES, NSDL & RCN) have built on the Problem Space model when designing their curriculum. The TUES grant to the Rocky Mountain Biological Lab, Bringing a Field Station in the classroom, the Science Collaboratory Project, Cyberleanring at Community Colleges (C3), and the recently funded Data Discovery RCN out of Michigan State University. The Problem Space model has also influenced efforts by scientists, data providers, and professional societies to promote the use of research data in undergraduate biology education. The DryadLab project brought together scientists, science educators, and informatics specialists to create open curriculum models using research data stored in the Dryad data repository. The Ecological Society of American in conjunction with the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology adapted features of Problem Spaces in their Data in the Classrooms project. Finally, Kristin Jenkins and I presented a half-day symposium on the use of large datasets in classrooms at the 2012 Society for the Study of Evolution meeting (https://bit.ly/SSE_EdSymposium2012).

Describe any unexpected challenges you encountered and your methods for dealing with them: The recent attention to engaging students with research data is providing Problem Spaces with a new focus. The emergence of scientific data literacy as a means for developing a technically sophisticated workforce and the ongoing attention for the development of quantitative and computational biology skills provide new opportunities for the application of the Problem Space model. The BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium (the organizational home for Problem Spaces) has long encouraged faculty to bridge science and education by engaging students in scientific problem solving. However, sustaining communities of faculty scholarship is especially challenging when the faculty members returns to their institution and is often isolated. We see potential in Vision and Change outreach as a networking mechanism to support these communities

Describe your completed dissemination activities and your plans for continuing dissemination: Some of the more mature Problem Spaces have been collected and disseminated through https://bioquest.org/bedrock/problem_spaces/ . Other projects, including a large number of workshop participant generated materials are available at https://bioquest.org/bedrock/participant_projects.php . We plan to prepare a more synthetic description of the instructional philosophy that guides Problem Spaces for publication.

Acknowledgements: The Problem Space curriculum model evolved as part of a NSF funded CCLI National Dissemination project titled BEDROCK Bioinformatics Education Dissemination. John R. Jungck was the PI of that project. Over time, the model of a Problem Space has been deeply integrated into a wide range of projects associated with the BIOQUST Curriculum Consortium. Ethel Stanley, Stacey Kiser, Tony Weisstein, Kristin Jenkins and many, many others have made significant contributions to this project.

Class Generated Community Clicker Cases

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Title of Abstract: Class Generated Community Clicker Cases

Name of Author: tamar goulet
Author Company or Institution: University of MIssissippi
Author Title: Associate Professor
PULSE Fellow: No
Applicable Courses: Ecology and Environmental Biology, Organismal Biology, Physiology & Anatomy
Course Levels: Introductory Course(s)
Approaches: Assessment, Changes in Classroom Approach (flipped classroom, clickers, POGIL, etc.), Material Development
Keywords: Case studies, Clickers, Interviews, Involvement

Name, Title, and Institution of Author(s): Lainy B. Day, University of Mississippi Kristen A. Byler, University of Mississippi Kathleen Sullivan, University of Mississippi

Goals and intended outcomes of the project or effort, in the context of the Vision and Change report and recommendations: The goal of the study was to empirically test the efficacy of this novel pedagogic approach as an alternative technique to lecturing in a large, non-majors introductory biology course. In addition, multiple presentations and workshops at academic institutions, from 2-year community colleges to research-one institutions, exposed multiple faculty to this educational approach, potentially transforming their teaching.

Describe the methods and strategies that you are using: Class Generated Community Clicker Cases (CGCCC) is an innovative pedagogical approach that integrates and capitalizes on the strengths of both case studies and clickers. In CGCCC, students are given questionnaires that they fill out by interviewing members of their community, thereby creating the cases. Answers are collected in class via clickers and class discussion. Students’ data gathering advances the course content coverage, turning the disadvantage of large introductory non-major classes into an educational asset, and creates personal investment in the subject matter.

Describe the evaluation methods that you used (or intended to use) to determine whether the project or effort achieved the desired goals and outcomes: The effectiveness of CGCCC versus lecturing were assessed using four indicators, two dealing with knowledge of biology, and two dealing with students’ perceptions of the study of biology. The indicators were: 1) Extent of students’ factual knowledge; 2) Extent of students’ ability to assimilate and apply the learned information; 3) Rates of student attendance in the class; and 4) Extent of self-reported student satisfaction with the course. This study also addressed faculty members’ apprehension of non-lecture techniques by providing data on alternative methods for teaching large introductory science classrooms. Data collection thus far occurred during the Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Fall 2011 and Spring 2012 semesters. In each semester, to control for instructor bias, the same instructor taught two class sections, one in the CGCCC approach and one via lecture. In the Fall 2010 and Fall 2011 semesters, two faculty, each teaching a CGCCC and lecture class, collected data, enabling between instructor comparison. A total of 12 class sections thus far participated in the study, 6 sections taught via CGCCC (total n = 603) and 6 sections taught in a lecture format (total n = 618). To control for a potential clicker effect, both CGCCC and lecture sections used clickers to collect student responses during the class period and during exams.

Impacts of project or effort on students, fellow faculty, department or institution. If no time to have an impact, anticipated impacts: Students in the CGCCC class with more positive perceptions of the interview component of the class tended to earn higher test grades than did students who reported lower levels of satisfaction with the interview component. The CGCCC approach did affect students’ attitudes. Students described a gain from the interviews, for example the interviews connected science with their lives, they thought interviewing people was interesting, and they learned to identify central issues via the interviews. These gains may affect attitudes towards, and long-term retention of, biological content. Following my colleague's involvement as a senior personnel in my grant, my colleague applied for and received her own TUES grant in which she is utilizing case studies in an upper undergraduate level neurobiology course for biology majors. The Department Chair was supportive of testing the CGCCC approach and provided the room and section time slots that enabled comparisons of the sections.

Describe any unexpected challenges you encountered and your methods for dealing with them: The teaching approach being tested relies on students conducting interviews and reading the textbook. A challenge emerged of having the students take the interviews seriously. We therefore assigned points for the interviews. To address reading the book, we created an assignment where students had to write the page numbers that pertained to the interview questions. Students received points for this assignment. Students’ prior knowledge and students’ current academic performance affect their learning success in a non-majors introductory biology course. In tandem with applying novel pedagogical approaches, students’ perception of their ability to learn and students’ commitment to learning need to be assessed and perhaps modified.

Describe your completed dissemination activities and your plans for continuing dissemination: This project will affect both students and faculty. Due to the workshops and other dissemination venues, the project’s influence will transcend the University of Mississippi.

Acknowledgements: This study was supported by The National Science Foundation (DUE-0942290)

Animal Diversity Web -- A Resource for Learning and Teaching

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Title of Abstract: Animal Diversity Web -- A Resource for Learning and Teaching

Name of Author: Phil Myers
Author Company or Institution: University of Michigan
Author Title: Professor
PULSE Fellow: No
Applicable Courses: Ecology and Environmental Biology, Evolutionary Biology, General Biology, Integrative Biology, Marine Biology, Organismal Biology, Physiology & Anatomy
Course Levels: Across the Curriculum, Introductory Course(s), Upper Division Course(s)
Approaches: Assessment, Changes in Classroom Approach (flipped classroom, clickers, POGIL, etc.), Material Development
Keywords: inquiry, comparative biology, organismal biology, natural history, active learning

Name, Title, and Institution of Author(s): Tanya Dewey, University of Michigan George Hammond, University of MIchigan Roger Espinosa, University of Michigan Tricia Jones, University of Michigan

Goals and intended outcomes of the project or effort, in the context of the Vision and Change report and recommendations: Our understanding of the patterns and processes that underlie fields including ecology, evolutionary biology, conservation biology and related disciplines is based largely on knowledge accumulated by studying species of organisms. These data are complex, reported in different ways by different investigators, and usually not stored in central repositories using consistent metadata. Thus, while data from these fields potentially can be used to address Vision and Change Core Concepts 1 (Evolution), 2 (Structure and Function, and 5 (Systems), and Core Competencies 1 (Ability to Apply the Process of Science), 2 (Ability to use Quantitative Reasoning), 4 (Ability to Tap into the Interdisciplinary Nature of Science), 5 (Ability to Communicate and Collaborate with Other Disciplines), and possibly 3 (Ability to Use Modeling and Simulation), biologists in these disciplines have had little success at incorporating inquiry activities or other forms of active learning based on them in their classrooms. This in sharp contrast to the wealth of resources for inquiry learning in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology (e.g. BioQuest, BioSciEdNet, GenBank, etc.). To answer this need, beginning in 1995, we created an on-line database of species biology that students could search to discover for themselves these patterns and processes and test hypotheses based on them. The Animal Diversity Web (ADW, https://animaldiversity.org), is built with student contributions of information about animal species that are reviewed for accuracy and incorporated into a structured database that allows flexible re-use. The ADW is one of the most widely used natural history databases online globally, with nearly 4000 detailed taxon descriptions and a wide user base, delivering over 1 million page views to 300,000+ site visitors monthly. Over 70% of visitors report using the ADW for educational purposes. The ADW is currently the only natural history online that allows flexible querying of data.

Describe the methods and strategies that you are using: Writing ADW species accounts has become an important part of many organismal biology courses. Accounts are submitted through a structured online template that supports literature review and synthesis and provides experience writing in the discipline. Published accounts on ADW serve as examples of student work for job and graduate applications and are used by faculty to document teaching impact. The ADW product that has the greatest potential to provide transformative undergraduate educational experiences is its rich and structured database . We built and refined a complex querying tool that enables students to discover patterns and test hypotheses on their own, and we are working with instructors to create and incorporate inquiry-based activities based on it in their classes (https://animaldiversity.org/q). This flexible and powerful tool has now been tested and successfully incorporated in a wide range of biology courses. A library of activities, organized by the nature of the course for which it was written, is shared on the site and activities are added regularly as they are developed and tested by faculty.

Describe the evaluation methods that you used (or intended to use) to determine whether the project or effort achieved the desired goals and outcomes: Evaluation focuses on impact on students, impact on faculty, and success at incorporating new sources of data. We combine interviews, frequent interactions, and formal questionnaires to address impact on faculty. The focus is on their assessment of the impact of our materials on their students, the degree to which activities are aligned with their curricula, and the effectiveness of our training sessions with the faculty themselves. Students respond to questions before and after the activities that test their inquiry and reasoning skills, the ease of use of our database and querying tools, and their attitude about science. Measures of success regarding the incorporation of new data are mainly quantitative: how many sources do we integrate, how extensively are they used by participants, etc. All assessment is designed and lead by an external evaluator.

Impacts of project or effort on students, fellow faculty, department or institution. If no time to have an impact, anticipated impacts: We are currently incorporating activities based on the ADW query engine into classrooms of approximately 35 faculty at 30 institutions nationwide, including evaluation of impacts on student and faculty perceptions. Our goal is to provide engaging, inquiry-based educational experiences that align with curricula in organismal biology courses. Participating institutions include large, research-intensive universities, smaller 4-year colleges that emphasize teaching, and 2-year colleges. Even wider dissemination of this tool and research outcomes is anticipated in summer 2013 as a result of presentations at key meetings of professional societies. ADW taxon account writing has been used as a formal part of teaching ‘organismal’ courses at over 65 institutions, including some that have participated for over 10 years. These accounts represent the work of over 1500 student authors since 2010.

Describe any unexpected challenges you encountered and your methods for dealing with them: The challenges of bringing together diverse data streams are daunting, and to address thm, we were recently awarded a NSF RCN-UBE Incubator grant (1247821) to bring undergraduate biology education projects together with large biological database projects. Our goal is to develop a set of recommendations to make these kinds of authentic data available in formats accessible to students. A meeting of participating projects will take place this summer. If the goal of increasing the accessibility of data can be accomplished, the possibilities of rich research experiences for students that cut across a variety of disciplines becomes very real. Despite our impact at other institutions and in the broader education community, we have encountered obstacles to instituting change in our own department at the University of Michigan. Few faculty colleagues have expressed interest in modifying their own teaching approach. However, we have received strong encouragement from our department chair and from the college to further develop the ADW project, as it is recognized as an important education and outreach resource.

Describe your completed dissemination activities and your plans for continuing dissemination: The Animal Diversity Web maintains strong and active collaborative relationships with many other biology education resource projects, such as Encyclopedia of Life, VertNet, and AmphibiaWeb. We regularly share ideas about new developments and resources with a broad community of other organizations involved in promoting inquiry-driven learning in undergraduate courses and data useful in inquiry. The ADW actively participates in efforts to support innovative, inquiry-driven approaches to undergraduate biology education. We recently participated in the inaugural Life Discovery-Doing Science conference organized by the ESA (https://www.esa.org/ldc/). ADW has helped to organize and present at workshops to promote inquiry-driven learning approaches at 2012 and 2013 Evolution Meetings. Finally, the ADW has taken the lead in organizing a workshop that will bring together national leaders in promoting innovation in biology education and databases that organize and share data that is useful in education. The goal of this workshop, recently funded by NSF as an RCN-UBE Incubator project, is to develop a strategic plan for enhancing the accessibility and use of real biological data in undergraduate education.

Acknowledgements: We gratefully acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation (DRL 0089283, DRL 0628151, DUE 0633095, DRL 0918590, DUE 1122742, DBI 1247821). We also thank Prof. Nancy Songer and her group in the Univ. Michigan School of Education for 15 years of productive collaboration and patient instruction in the field of education.

Enhancing Science Learning through the Arts

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Title of Abstract: Enhancing Science Learning through the Arts

Name of Author: Wendy Silk
Author Company or Institution: University of California at Davis
PULSE Fellow: No
Applicable Courses: All Biological Sciences Courses, Ecology and Environmental Biology, Plant Biology & Botany
Course Levels: General Education, Introductory Course(s), Science and Society
Approaches: Adding to the literature on how people learn, Assessment, Changes in Classroom Approach (flipped classroom, clickers, POGIL, etc.), Enhancing understanding and improving communication through art projects, Material Development
Keywords: Science literacy, creativity, arts-based learning, science appreciation, environmental science

Name, Title, and Institution of Author(s): Merryl Goldberg, California State University

Goals and intended outcomes of the project or effort, in the context of the Vision and Change report and recommendations: More than ever in human history, global environmental problems inspire us to seek better public access to scientific knowledge and new paradigms for collaboration. For instance, one in five plant species are estimated to be under threat of extinction; sickness of pollinators is threatening food production; and pollution is threatening human health. This paper will review two programs to enhance science learning via the arts: the Art/Science fusion program at the University of California at Davis (UCD), and a networking project to explore incorporating music into biology curricula. Our goals are enhanced scientific literacy and better communication skills for undergraduates and increased appreciation of science and scientists.

Describe the methods and strategies that you are using: In the hope that artists will better acquire scientific literacy, while scientists will better access art as a means of expression and communication , entomologist Diane Ullman, ceramic artist Donna Billick, meteorologist Terrence Nathan and botanist Wendy Silk have established an Art/Science fusion program at the University of California, Davis. Ullman and Billick teach “Art, Science and the World of Insects” in which students create visual art projects. Silk teaches “Earth Water Science Song” with student songwriting and performance, and Nathan teaches “Photography: Bridging Art and Science.” In each course the students hear lectures on biology or environmental science and then create art projects to communicate their understanding of the science. In our classes students are active participants, not passive recipients, as they translate science concepts into works of art. We use multiple modes of instruction. Moreover, the students become teachers to the community as they create performances and public works of art. Our classes involve cooperative learning, known to increase understanding. By blending science and art in the classroom students learn first-hand how interdisciplinarity can integrate science and enhance creativity. Our curricula include case studies to show the relevance of biology to the world outside academia. Inspired by positive student reaction to her course Earth, Water, Science, Song, Silk sought and led an NSF-sponsored incubator project. The focus of this project was the use of music to expand student access to biology and to magnify collaborative and innovative thinking. We created a consortium across several educational institutions whereby biology and arts faculty engaged in dialogue, practice, and reflection to improve the teaching of undergraduate biology through arts-based methods.

Describe the evaluation methods that you used (or intended to use) to determine whether the project or effort achieved the desired goals and outcomes: We followed the number of offerings of Art/Science classes and the numbers of student enrolled. Student appreciation was monitored with written evaluation forms. Learning was assessed with pre-and post- tests. Merryl Goldberg communicated the results of a large study assessing the educational impact of including art on the learning of other subjects in elementary school. Silk, Goldberg, and statistician Marie Thomas collaborated to assess and improve student learning outcomes in undergraduate Art/Science classes.

Impacts of project or effort on students, fellow faculty, department or institution. If no time to have an impact, anticipated impacts: Participants came from several organizational settings: large public research universities, a public teaching university, a private music college, and industry. Notably, our UC Davis faculty teamed with Merryl Goldberg and her colleagues at CSUSM, an institution known for leadership in arts-based learning and recognized as an Asian American-, Pacific Islander- and Hispanic- serving institution. Goldberg found good evidence that arts can play a role in kinesthetic learning and thus improve general education (https://www.ed.gov/oii-news/dream-integrating-arts-increase-reading-proficiency). We also found that undergraduate students react enthusiastically and work hard to learn science when it is coupled to musical creativity and performance. In the past three years the environmental science class taught with ArtScience fusion has received student evaluations of 4.4-4.9 (out of 5.0) while a class taught by the same instructor with similar class size and subject matter (without music projects) received 3.3-4.1. Monitoring websites with science music videos confirms that these are attracting increasing attention from people of all ages. Pre- and post-tests have confirmed that undergraduate students learn a great deal of science in the ArtScience courses. We had many young participants including 460 students over three years at UC Davis alone. Also, our undergraduate students became teachers to the larger communities who saw student performances and art installations. Teaching assistants (funded by the campus administrations) became network participants and contributed substantially to the project. Our mentoring of graduate students yielded strong outcomes; recently one of our teaching assistants received the campus’ highest honor for graduate student teaching. We have been approached by faculty from science departments in other universities interested in Art/Science fusion and faculty from music and art departments interested in improving their science teaching.

Describe any unexpected challenges you encountered and your methods for dealing with them: The effectiveness of arts education in improving learning is well documented at the K-12 level. James Catterall and colleagues have found that youthful involvement in the arts associates with higher levels of achievement and college attainment, higher paying and more professional jobs, and deeper community involvement (e.g. https://www.nea.gov/research/arts-at-risk-youth.pdf ). Furthermore, Merryl Goldberg’s research has found that arts-based methods are powerful tools in the education of English language learners, many of whom are also underrepresented students. For older students evidence abounds that singing works as a memory aid, and neurobiologists are documenting and explaining the positive affect of music. But arts are rarely incorporated into science classes at the university. While informal testing in our classes supports our hypothesis that learning is enhanced when art projects are added to the curriculum, we have not yet been successful in obtaining funding to conduct a large scale study. And without such studies it is difficult to convince administrators and policy makers to encourage these unconventional curricula.

Describe your completed dissemination activities and your plans for continuing dissemination: We produced expansion of course offerings in Art/Science, training of teaching assistants, dissemination of some teaching materials via a networking website, Greg Crowther’s updated database of science songs for teaching, reports to professional societies, outreach publicizing and educating about nature preserves, and web-based dissemination of some student videos. Network participants published three scholarly articles in journals. Silk contributed to a white paper sent to the NSF and published on the XSEAD website. Two meetings facilitated exchange of ideas and learning about experiences in teaching biology with music and visual art. The ArtScience program at UC Davis has recently formed an expanded faculty consortium. We are seeking funding for educational testing and program enhancement.

Acknowledgements: NSF RCN-UBE Incubator # 0956196: Trial network to bring music to the study of biology Prof. Diane Ullman UCD Donna Billick ceramic artist Prof. Terrance Nathan UCD Dr. Gregory Crowther UW Prof. Marie Thomas CSUSM Prof. Betsy Read CSUSM Dr. Anthony Dumas SUNY